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the mind machine

the mind machine

The mind machine is a podcast devoted to the latest research in applied neurosciences, physiological computing, neuroadaptive interfaces and human factors psychology. Each episode features a conversation with a different researcher about their work. Our discussions will focus on emerging technologies, such as: brain-computer interfaces, system automation, affective computing, wearable sensors and assistive technology. The conversations will cover technical aspects of the work as well as potential societal impacts. The podcast will present academic research in a way that is both informal and accessible for both professional and non-professional listeners.

Ep 6: Dick De Waard on Traffic Psychology 07.05.2019, 03:00
Ep 6: Dick De Waard on Traffic Psychology

<p>In episode 6 of the mind machine, I talk to Prof. Dick De Waard about his research into traffic psychology and human factors.&#160; We discuss how driving behaviour is measured on the real-road and in simulators and how psychophysiological methods can be integrated into those environments.&#160; We also have a long chat about the measurement of mental workload and the logistics of doing applied research, particularly with users of illegal drugs.</p>

Ep5: Klaus Gramann on Mobile Brain-Body Imaging 17.03.2019, 02:00
Ep5: Klaus Gramann on Mobile Brain-Body Imaging

<p>In the fifth episode of the podcast, I talk to Professor Klaus Gramann of the Berlin Mobile Brain-Body Imaging (MoBI) Lab.&#160; We discuss his work on studying spatial navigation and other topics while measuring brain activity in fully mobile participants.&#160; We also talk about the role of wearable sensors and VR that enable this type of research and issues related to signal processing of the EEG.&#160; Klaus also talks about future directions in MoBI research, such as studying the effects of architecture and artistic creation.</p>

Ep4: Frederic Dehais on Aviation Psychology 12.02.2019, 23:00
Ep4: Frederic Dehais on Aviation Psychology

<p>In this fourth episode of the podcast, I talk to Professor Frederic Dehais from the University of Toulouse.&#160; Fred talks about his background and his work applying neurosciences to the area of aviation psychology.&#160; We talk about his research into pilot error and the pros and cons of using neurophysiological methods in the cockpit, particularly EEG and fNIRS.&#160; Fred talks about the role of attention in accident formation with reference to applied neurosciences.&#160; We also talk about research in the field of neuroergonomics.</p>

Ep3: Wendy Rogers on Cognitive Ageing & Social Robotics 16.01.2019, 16:00
Ep3: Wendy Rogers on Cognitive Ageing & Social Robotics

<p>Prof. Wendy Rogers talks about her research into cognitive ageing and the design of technology to support the ageing process.&#160; Our conversation covers the development of Wendy's work, from the study of skill acquisition to understanding the process of technology acceptance in older users.&#160; We also talk about Wendy's work on social robotics and designing robots to support older users in everyday life.</p>

Ep2: Alan Pope on Biocybernetic Loop & Neurofeedback 05.11.2018, 02:00
Ep2: Alan Pope on Biocybernetic Loop & Neurofeedback

<p>In the episode, I talk to Dr. Alan Pope from the NASA Langley Research Centre in Hampton, Virginia.&#160; Alan talks about how his passion for engineering and psychology led to his research on mental workload, the biocybernetic loop and neurofeedback systems.&#160; Our conversation also takes in the influence of cybernetics on his work, how to use EEG to measure psychological states and the methodological issues around constructing and evaluating systems that use measures from the body and brain in real-time.&#160;</p>

Ep1: Thorsten Zander on passive BCI 02.10.2018, 03:00
Ep1: Thorsten Zander on passive BCI

<p>A conversation with Dr. Thorsten Zander about his research on passive brain-computer interfaces (BCI) and neuroadaptive technology. Steve talks to Thorsten about the field of neuroergonomics, multimodal BCI, passive BCI and ethics. The conversation also covers using brain activity to assess bluffing during a card game and using EEG data to assess mental workload.&#160;</p>